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The New Apple Classroom

Need to reset your managed Apple ID password? Click here.

With new changes to Apple Classroom it has become more important to make the move toward using Managed Apple IDs when signing into iCloud on school devices.  This includes student iPads, teacher iPads, and teacher MacBooks.  Learn more about Apple IDs.

Apple Classroom Step 1 – System Requirements and Managed Apple ID

On your teacher device it is imperative that you sign into iCloud with a Managed Apple ID. Please also watch this video to see system requirements.

Apple Classroom Step 2 – Setup and Add Students

Watch this video to learn how to create your classrooms and add students.

Step 3 – Reset Student Managed Apple ID Passwords

Learn how to reset Managed Apple IDs for your students after you have added them to your class.

Step 4 – Using Apple Classroom

Apple Classroom is used to guide instruction in the classroom. It is an essential tool for every classroom teacher!

Setting up Managed Apple ID on a MacBook

View video to learn how to sign in using your managed Apple ID on your Mac (what’s this?). This will allow Apple Classroom on your iPad and your MacBook to sync automatically.

With your iPad and MacBook both signed into iCloud with the Managed Apple ID, it will allow Apple Classroom classes to sync across devices so you only have to set up your classes once!  Even if your device would need to be wiped or reset, your classes would come back once you sign into your Managed Apple ID and then open Apple Classroom.

Please understand the immense importance of everyone using the Managed Apple IDs.  If one person chooses to use a regular Apple ID in iCloud, they will not be able to get Apple Classroom to work unless they sign out all the students as well.  If that is done, it will cause all other teachers who are using the Managed Apple ID to not be able to use Apple Classroom until all their students are signed back in.  


Have you forgotten your managed Apple ID? No problem. You can contact your building’s TSS or request a reset here and we will send it to you via email as quickly as possible.


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Inspire Girls with Herstory

Recently, we celebrated Black History Month. In much the same way that history was often not recorded, and certainly not published, women’s history in the United States was often overlooked and omitted from our collective history. Although women’s contributions were as important and influential, the history of these were often left on the cutting room floor.

Each time a girl opens a book and reads a womanless history, she learns she is worth less.

Myra Pollack Sadker

History helps up learn who we are. When we don’t see ourselves in history, it’s difficult to see the path forward. Fortunately, it is 2020 and the important contributions by women are getting their due. The recognition of these accomplishments remind us, not just girls and women, but all of us, that a society is the sum of all of its parts. Together, we are writing history that brings equality and recognition for the accomplishments of all.

Katherine Johnson, 1918 – 2020

With the recent death of Katherine Johnson, a brilliant NASA mathematician, and a native of White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia, it’s important to continue to inspire new generations of girls. One way to do that is through STEM/STEAM education. Wood County Schools offers many STEAM opportunities for students to learn and explore.

Find ideas for apps, podcasts, and more below for celebrating Women’s History Month throughout March.

Lessons in Herstory

Lessons in Herstory App uses AR to bring to life forgotten stories of women, right on the pages of your history textbook. Scan any portrait of a man in your textbook and unlock a related story about an important woman. Currently, Lessons In Herstory works with “A History of US: Liberty for All? 1820-1860, Book Five, 2005”. The app will soon expand to work with more textbooks. But don’t worry if you don’t have a textbook, you can still use the app with the photos available on http://www.lessonsinherstory.com. By putting a new lens on history, this app has the power to inspire the next generation through stories of powerful women.

EngineerGirl

The EngineerGirl website is designed to bring national attention to the exciting opportunities that engineering represents for girls and women.  Why girls and women?  Because despite an increase in female participation in many traditionally male-dominated professions such as medicine and law, women remain grossly under-represented in engineering.   Engineering and engineers are central to the process of innovation, and innovation drives economic growth.  Diversity of thought is crucial to creativity, and by leaving women out of the process of innovation we lose a key component of diversity and stifle innovation.  We want the creative problem-solvers of tomorrow to fully represent the world’s population, because they will be the ones to ensure our health, happiness, and safety in years to come.

Shirley Chisholm: Portrait of a Pioneer

Shirley Chisholm, an American educator, author, and politician, became the first African American woman elected to the United States Congress in 1968. She was also the first African American and woman to run for the Democratic Party’s nomination in 1972. She was a trailblazer.

Listen to a remembrance of Ms. Chisholm produced by NPR.

Listen to Ms. Chisholm in her own words.

Women’s History Shared In Podcasts

Find inspiring stories and lessons from our past with Women’s History themed podcasts from every angle. Please note that each podcast has not been vetted. Review before including in a lesson plan.

Notable Women AR

Notable Women is an augmented reality app that lets anyone see 100 historic American women where they’ve historically been left out: U.S. currency. Discover the accomplishments of activists, artists, scientists, business leaders, writers, civic leaders and more—right on the money in your wallet. Share a woman who inspires you with #NotableWomen and learn more at NotableWomen.com. Notable Women is a project by former Treasurer of the United States Rosie Rios, made with some friends from Google.

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Celebrate Black History Month

Carter Godwin Woodson

Create engaging lessons using technology and help your students celebrate and understand the importance of Black History Month.

Black History Month, also known as African American History Month, is an annual observance in the United States and many other countries around the world. The observance recognizes the history and important figures in the African diaspora.

The precursor to Black History Month was created in 1926 in the United States, when historian Carter G. Woodson and the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History announced the second week of February to be “Negro History Week”. This week was chosen because it coincided with the birthday of Abraham Lincoln on February 12 and of Frederick Douglass on February 14, both of which dates black communities had celebrated together since the late 19th century. Negro History Week was the center of the equation. The thought-process behind the week was never recorded, but scholars acknowledge two reasons for its birth: recognition and importance. Woodson felt deeply that at least one week would allow for the general movement to become something annually celebrated. Also, after the ten year long haul to successfully complete his “Journal of Negro History,” he realized the subject deserved to resonate with a greater audience. ~ Wikipedia

The words of Franklin Thomas remind us that we still have a long way to go.

One day our descendants will think it incredible that we paid so much attention to things like the amount of melanin in our skin or the shape of our eyes or our gender instead of the unique identities of each of us as complex human beings.

His words also remind us that knowing the past will open doors to our future.

Open these doors and utilize technology to provide for an engaging lesson or simple discussion for students of all ages. In celebrating Black History Month, students will learn that we all share so much in common.


Black History Month by Romulus Education

Romulus Black History Month is a quiz-based application of iOS devices designed to help students acquaint themselves with the subject of Black History.

This free app contains 100 questions addressing major topics in Black History from Colonial America to the present, with some World History questions added for good measure. All questions include explanations so that users can gain additional context when they miss a question.

Alabama Civil Rights Trail

Walk in the footsteps of the Civil Rights Movement by exploring the people, places and events that brought Alabama into the international spotlight and changed the course of history. The official Alabama Civil Rights Trail app helps you:

• Discover civil rights landmarks across the state
• Plan your visit to Birmingham, Montgomery, Selma, Tuskegee and other cities that were pivotal in the Civil Rights Movement
• Explore an interactive timeline that takes you through the struggle for equality, from Jim Crow and mob violence to desegregation and the Civil Rights Act
• Browse biographies of famous figures like Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King Jr., then learn where you can visit to relive their legacies
• View maps of civil rights destinations within each featured city

SFT Black History Radio

This Radio app randomly plays over 50 songs honoring African American History including biographical songs of great Black Americans such as Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks, Sojourner Truth, Harriet Tubman, and Jackie Robinson. These songs address African American themes of pride, history and culture, making a great addition to any classroom year round, but especially in honor and celebration of Black History Month. Primarily geared for 2nd – 6th grade, this app can be enjoyed by all. Songs come from a wide variety of Songs For Teaching artists. The app costs 99 cents.

The 1619 Project Podcast

In August of 1619, a ship carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans arrived in the English colony of Virginia. America was not yet America, but this was the moment it began. No aspect of the country that would be formed here has been untouched by the 250 years of slavery that followed. On the 400th anniversary of this fateful moment, it is time to tell the story. “1619” is a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. The podcast is best suited for a high school audience.

Black History Inventors

From fountain pens, mops, batteries, paints, furnaces, rotary engines to anything you can imagine inventors of color have used brain power to create it all. Their variety of inventions are extraordinary. Black History Inventors app includes many amazing women and men. Some individuals received U.S. patents. You can listen to historical inventor stories through your speaker or headphones spoken by a real person. Scan through all of the inventors to learn more about their contributions to modern living.

African Americans in STEM

STEM African American Pioneer Flash Cards: Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics (Plus Medical and Health). This historical education app will teach children about the amazing contributions of African Americans to the STEM and Medical/Health fields. Against the odds, these 106 individuals excelled and helped propel the United States forward.

The Book of Negroes Historical Guide

This interactive companion outlines the history of the trans-Atlantic slave trade and how this is reflected and examined in Lawrence Hill’s award-winning novel and BET Television mini-series, The Book of Negroes. The six-part BET mini-series follows the life of Aminata Diallo, a young African girl kidnapped by slave traders and brought across the Atlantic to North America. In the course of her long and hard life, Aminata is a witness to major events in the slave trade and the history of Black North Americans. Over seven chapters, the app provides a timeline of Black history from 1705 to the present day. In addition, it explores the historical grounding of both the novel and series in the original Book of Negroes historical document, which identified Black slaves who fought for the British during the American Revolution. Using images, videos, and interactive maps, the guide follows the far-reaching impact of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. For educational settings, the guide features optional discussion questions and further investigation of the various topics. An intuitive interface allows users to swipe, tap, and scroll through chapters to engage with interactive features in a linear or nonlinear fashion, and gain a deeper understanding of the historical events portrayed in The Book of Negroes.

On Behalf of the WV Department of Arts, Culture and History

The WV Department of Arts, Culture and History (WVDACH) is pleased to announce STEAM Power WV, an innovative grant program that supports education initiatives for West Virginia’s pre-k-12 students.  Partnering with the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation, the WVDACH is encouraging schools and non-profit organizations to integrate the Arts with STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) disciplines in their curriculum and educational programming.

STEAM projects explore the intersections between STEM and the Arts, encouraging innovation, creative problem solving, critical thinking, interdisciplinary teamwork and other aptitudes that are essential to students’ college and career readiness.

Applicants may request up to $7,500 and must provide a cash match of at least 1/3 of the amount requested. The application deadline is October 1, 2022. Projects must take place between January 1, 2023 and December 31, 2023.

STEAM Power WV grant guidelines, application instructions, and the link to apply are available on the WVDACH’s STEAM website: www.wvculture.org/agencies/arts/steam/

Please feel free to share this Request for Proposals with other educators as well as with community partners and potential collaborators.

If you have questions about applying, or if you need assistance developing your STEAM project, please contact Jim Wolfe in the Arts Section of the West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture and History. He can be reached at (304) 558-0240 or james.d.wolfe@wv.gov

Sharing Microsoft Teams Recordings in Schoology

Educators in Wood County Schools’ Distance Learning Academy (DLA) adapt their instruction to deliver lessons in ways that make use of several digital platforms. Although this video was created for educators in the DLA, it can be useful for any educator wanting to find additional ways to record (and protect) their instruction for students. Perhaps their students are at home with health issues. Or, perhaps one of their students learns better by viewing a lesson more than once on her or his own timeline.

In this video: Learn how to record your instruction using Microsoft Teams and then share the recording in your Schoology course.

Graphic Organizers, Brainstorming, & Ticket-Out-the-Door

Finding Useful Ways of Integrating Microsoft Whiteboard Into Your Instruction

Using Microsoft’s recently updated Whiteboard application allows you and your students to quickly brainstorm ideas, use KWL charts, Venn diagrams and so much more. You can even create a ticket-out-the-door on the fly!

Use a Whiteboard in Myriad Ways

You ask, “What would I use a whiteboard for in my classroom?

The beauty of a whiteboard application is that it is as flexible as your imagination. This makes it as adaptable to the needs of a preschool teacher as to the needs of someone teaching advanced algebra or honors world history. Whiteboards are great for brainstorming sessions, activating prior knowledge, creating interactive graphic organizers, problem solving, critical thinking, classroom collaboration and Wait Time (aka Time-to-Think).

Getting Started

Open Microsoft’s Whiteboard by visiting whiteboard.office.com or download the app on your iPad. Sign in using your Microsoft Office 365 account (this is the same as your email login credentials). The demonstration below is using the application on a webpage; however, Whiteboard is a PWA experience, which simply means that it works basically the same across all platforms. The tools and templates are the same on a laptop as on a tablet. It also means that you can start creating on your laptop and later continue on your iPad.

Setup a Simple Brainstorming Whiteboard

Follow these steps to learn how quick and easy it is to create a brainstorming template:

How can I use Whiteboard in my classroom?

There as several ways you can use a Whiteboard in your classroom. Depending on the lesson or activity, you may use a Whiteboard in multiple modes.

  • Airplay your Whiteboard from your iPad to a presentation screen such as a large television or projector — This method allows for walking around the room and easily engaging students.
  • Airplay from another device such as a MacBook (a smartphone works too!).
  • Share a link to the Whiteboard for students to view on their iPads. Simply add a link in your Schoology course for easy access.
  • Access from within Microsoft Teams. This can be used for both distance learning and brick-and-mortar instruction. For brick-and-mortar instruction, simply ask students to mute their microphones and turn off video.
  • Export the Whiteboard as a PNG image file for adding to your Schoology course or for AirDropping (in Apple Classroom) directly to students.

Application Overview

Let’s take a look at using Whiteboard so you can get started finding awesome ways to include this as a tool in your instruction.

How can I collaborate with my students?

By its very nature, whiteboards are designed to be collaborative. Using Whiteboard with your students allows for a more engaging instructional experience and allows students to use real-world tools that business, industry, and academia are using today. They learn skills they will need to compete with other students when they enter college or technical training.

When using Whiteboard to collaborate with students, be aware of some differences between the standalone version found on tablets and on whiteboard.office.com, and the version built-in to Teams.

  • The Teams version gives the teacher the option to toggle on or off the option for students to contribute to the whiteboard. However, this version does not allow you to select Whiteboard files that you have already created. You have to start from scratch in the Teams meeting. The whiteboard remains with the data of the meeting so you can always return to it later.
  • The app version found on tablets and at whiteboard.office.com allows for contribution from students, but there is no on/off switch to toggle. It’s either no contributions (or limited contributions) from students or the board is wide open for all. Unlike the Teams version, this version allows you to create Whiteboards ahead of time and keep them indefinitely. You are able to turn the sharing on and off, however, when off, access is removed for students to be able to contribute. It also means they can no longer view the document.

Where can I find Whiteboard?

You can easily download Whiteboard by searching keywords ‘Microsoft’ and ‘Whiteboard’ in Apple’s App Store. Students can find the app in Self Serve.

Where can I find assistance?

Find help on Microsoft’s website for many of the most common questions. Ready to move to the next level? Use Microsoft’s Tips & Tricks to learn more. Thinking about using Whiteboard in your classroom but need some ideas how you could use it or you just need some one-on-one assistance, reach out to Jimmy Stewart or Eric Murphy. Either would be happy to help you get started and take engagement to the next level.

GoGuardian Got You Down?

GoGuardian Update

As of February 22, 2022, use of GoGuardian has been discontinued by Wood County Schools.

Are you experiencing issues visiting legitimate websites for your instruction? It may be blocked by GoGuardian. Request that the website or specific URL be whitelisted so you can get back on track. The new tech work order system, SchoolDude, now offers this option.

Sign in to your SchoolDude account.


Under ‘Work Type,’ choose Whitelist Request.

GoGuardian Deployment on February 9

GoGuardian Update


As of February 22, 2022, use of GoGuardian has been discontinued by Wood County Schools.

On behalf of Jonathan Farley, WCS Management Information Services Director:

Go Guardian is being deployed to staff Macbooks and iPads on February 9th.   It will be pushed out before 7:00 AM that day.  Devices will grab the update as soon as they come online.      

It will appear on your iPad and you may have to look through your apps.

On MacBooks, you will need to look under your launchpad to find the Go Guardian app.

For launchpad, look for either icon:

You will need to launch the Go Guardian app which looks like this:

Once you have successfully launched the app you will get a screen that shows the following:

Once you see the above screen your internet browsers will work as normal. 

SchoolDude Work Order System Goes Live February 9

On behalf of Jonathan Farley, WCS Management Information Services Director:

Wood County Schools is moving to a new work order system called SchoolDude.  The purpose for going with SchoolDude is simplicity.  Any staff member can submit work orders by answering 4 questions.

Creating your Account

An email will be sent on February 9th to all staff so they can create a SchoolDude account.

The email will look like this:

Submitting a Work Order

The SchoolDude app will be pushed out to all staff iPads.  Click the app, enter your email, password, and select the help desk for the product selection.

The app looks like this:

The link below is for any user to use on MacBook/Windows devices.  Please save this link on your machine. 

[Editor’s note: This address will also be linked to every page of Innovate in the right-hand sidebar.]

http://login.schooldude.com/?&productid=TEHPDK 

Student Connection Issues with Apple Classroom

If you have seemingly random students that are not connecting to your class in Apple Classroom, here are some things you can try to remedy the situation.

  1. Of course, sometimes the issue is behavioral. Students turn off Bluetooth to avoid Apple Classroom but quickly turn it back on as a teacher approaches.
  2. Aside from this, the first place to start is making sure that a student’s Bluetooth is turned on in Apple Settings.
  3. Make sure the student’s iPadOS version is relatively up-to-date. It should be updated to at least iPadOS 14.6. If the iPad is using an older iPadOS, such as 13.1, this could be part of the problem. To update, go to Apple Settings, choose GENERAL > SOFTWARE UPDATE > DOWNLOAD AND INSTALL. If it won’t install, contact your Technology Systems Specialist (TSS) for assistance.
  4. Sign the student out of her or his Managed Apple ID and then sign back in. Learn how in this video.

We know Apple Classroom can be a big help in managing your instruction and your classroom. If you are still having issues, please don’t hesitate to reach out to Eric Murphy or Jimmy Stewart. Teaching is tough enough without all the technical issues. We can help get Apple Classroom back on track.


Find more general help with setting up classes and adding students to Apple Classroom here.

Missing Classes in Apple Classroom

Update from the MIS Department

The MIS department is working with Apple and is seeking ways to prevent the loss of manually created classes for Apple Classroom in Apple School Manager going forward. If you need assistance rebuilding your classes, please visit our post titled The New Apple Classroom.

This morning, you may have noticed that your classes are missing in Apple Classroom. The MIS department is aware of the issue. When they know more, we will be sure to pass along any information.

Some teachers have begun to rebuild their classes. There appears to be no harm in this with this caveat: Currently, it is unknown if a restoration of the data is possible. If it is, and an attempt to restore the data is not successful, any rebuilding of classes may be lost again.

Have a happy Monday! 🙄